Visual Note-Taking: An Exercise in Fluidity & Beauty

Artists and designers are typically great visual notetakers.

Some jot images, while others capture important talking points. Carolyn Sewell is one of those people who has elevated her visual notes into a form of art. Her quick-thinking, mark-making skills are not for the faint of heart—it takes skill and focus. Here, she talks about her note-taking process and the evolution of her craft.

Q. Have you always been a visual note-taker? i.e., even before you became an illustrator?

Carolyn: “I’ve always had a terrible memory, so at a young age I started sketching notes and doodles in my books to help me visualize the information.”

“I doubt I would’ve graduated high school or college, without this technique. And since my memory hasn’t improved, I continue to take visual notes at design lectures and conferences. There’s just something about hearing, processing, and drawing the content that cements it to my memory. The pen is my hearing aid. I can’t listen without it!” Read the rest here.

2014_UUDDConf_Sktch1

Expert Tips on How to Create a Killer Digital Portfolio

Online portfolios are of the utmost importance for creative professionals today. If you’re in the process of developing a digital portfolio, you can’t afford to view it as a mere collection of work samples; you need to think of it as your preeminent marketing piece. Following are expert tips on strategically developing a digital portfolio that pops.

Ram Castillo is an award-winning designer and art director, and author of How to Get a Job as a Designer, Guaranteed. He’s also the instructor of a CreativeLive course titled Create a Knockout Design Portfolio. Here, Castillo walks us through his top digital portfolio tips — what to include, what not to include, and how to put it all together to land that next creative job. Read the article, here.

Sharp, Sharper, Sharpiest: Timothy Goodman

Timothy Goodman is the author of Sharpie Art Workshop, a creative exploration of drawing anywhere, any time, on any surface using a Sharpie™ marker.

Co-designed by Dan Blackman, Goodman shares EZ exercises and steps that can bring out the creative artist in anyone.

The book includes the work of 22 talented artists and designers, especially women, a deliberate choice that Goodman explains: “I highlighted more women because I am inspired by creative risk taking among women around the world.” Goodman believes that for too long, talented women are overlooked and undervalued at creative conferences, award shows, and blogs. His book is a response to this.

Goodman says communication artists should  “approach creativity as a practice, not a profession,” a philosophy he brings to his classes at  the School of Visual Arts in New York. “Personally, I never wanted to be a professional. I wanted to make stuff I love. Some stuff you get paid to make and some stuff you make for yourself, but all of it is a useful exercise in creativity.” Read the rest of the article, here.

ace_hotel-6
Goodman doing a mural for the Ace Hotel in New York.