Archive for lettering

Danielle Evans Has a Serious Appetite for Lettering

Lettering designer Danielle Evans, aka Marmalade Bleue, turns edible objects into extraordinary 3D illustrious lettering designs. Ironically, the Columbus, Ohio native, almost pursued an education in culinary arts, but was drawn to illustration and design. Although, she admits, she had a rocky start.

“I knew good, dynamic work, but I was struggling to produce any and feared sharing my projects with others. The best designers were engaging their audiences across multisensory platforms and I wondered how to do this myself. I sat down at a coffee shop with a good educator friend and struggled for a jargon-less way to explain this inkling.

“I told her good design was like a cup of coffee, in that the consumer is having an experience, not just banally consuming a beverage; I wanted my work to do this as well. She, being very literal, asked if I’d considered making something out of coffee which was, in fact, a great idea.” Read the rest of the story here.

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Visual Note-Taking: An Exercise in Fluidity & Beauty

Artists and designers are typically great visual notetakers.

Some jot images, while others capture important talking points. Carolyn Sewell is one of those people who has elevated her visual notes into a form of art. Her quick-thinking, mark-making skills are not for the faint of heart—it takes skill and focus. Here, she talks about her note-taking process and the evolution of her craft.

Q. Have you always been a visual note-taker? i.e., even before you became an illustrator?

Carolyn: “I’ve always had a terrible memory, so at a young age I started sketching notes and doodles in my books to help me visualize the information.”

“I doubt I would’ve graduated high school or college, without this technique. And since my memory hasn’t improved, I continue to take visual notes at design lectures and conferences. There’s just something about hearing, processing, and drawing the content that cements it to my memory. The pen is my hearing aid. I can’t listen without it!” Read the rest here.

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The Rise of @Goodtype

Designer Brooke Bucherie, from Austin, Texas, was obsessed with type and hand lettering, so she collected it … sort of. She randomly gathered screen shots of type she loved online, and when her iPhone ran out of space, she started an Instagram feed called @Goodtype in 2013, to store her collection, crediting the artists who created the lettering. Over time, she noted that artists were hash-tagging their type pieces #goodtype, and people started following her feed—a lot of people. The Instagram feed now has more than 185,000 followers, and the numbers increase each week.

With its growing popularity, she’s decided to publish a book that will feature 100 never-before-seen lettering samples submitted by the Goodtype followers. Bucherie says, “I’m so excited to bring the Goodtype feed to life into a tangible form. I want to expose the work of these many talented individuals and get this book onto as many bookshelves, coffee tables, and classrooms as possible.” She’s planning on starting a Kickstarter campaign to get buy-in from her huge following so she can self-publish the book. “It should be a lot of fun and a great way to reward our followers,” she notes. Read the rest here.

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Jessica Hische Creates Sinfully Sweet Hand Lettering for a Starbucks Campaign

Hand lettering is all the rage, but very few artists do it as well as designer and typographer Jessica Hische.

Jessica Hische has become something of a sweetheart in the design world with her prolific output and her frequent appearances at industry conferences and events. Her lettering can be seen in movie titles like Moonrise Kingdom, on book covers, and in brand identities and advertisements for clients including Target, Livestrong, Bertoli, and Starbucks, among many others.

Here, she talks about collaborating with ad agency BBDO for a truly scrumptious campaign for Starbucks, featuring four of their signature lattes. Read the rest of the story here.

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9 Type Designers to Watch

When looking to create a “top” list of anything, it’s always best to ask the experts, which is precisely what we did here concerning type designers. Of course, typography, like everything else in art and design, is highly subjective. People like what they like. Period. But interestingly, when we reached out to highly respected type design aficionados Gail Anderson, Ken Barber, Roger Black, Tim Brown, Tobias Frere-Jones, Allan Haley, Cyrus Highsmith, Jason Santa Maria and Christian Schwartz and asked them who they thought should be interviewed for this article, there was a surprising amount of consensus among the suggestions.

Don’t expect to see the popular kids here. Sure, some may be familiar and some have been at it awhile, but others are just hitting their stride. Each designer featured has a unique take on their craft, and has had success with at least one typeface. Several of these creatives started as graphic designers and then pursued typography out of necessity, making type for themselves and clients. No matter the paths they followed, one thing is certain: The designers below are all reaching a creative apex. Read the rest here.

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Brandon typeface by Hannes von Döhren.

Sweden’s Snask is Sweet, Filthy, and Full of Life

Everything about Snask, a snarky Stockholm-based creative agency, is an anomaly. Their work ranges from handmade objects to digital commodities for clients near and far, and they take on so many self-initiated projects—like starting a record label, running their own design festival, brewing their own beer, writing a book, even designing a custom pink bike—that it makes you wonder how they have time for anything else. But they do. Creative director Fredrik Öst talks about the Snask philosophy and why it’s not cool to overwork your staff.

What does the word Snask mean?
Magnus Berg and I started Snask as an idea while we were studying in the U.K. We talked a lot about eye candy and that the design we wanted to make should be that. Snask means candy in old Swedish, but it also means filth and gossip, which we find brilliant. Basically, from 0-12 years old, you’ll do anything for candy, and from 12-70 you’ll do anything for filth. When you’re 70 and up, you gossip about children, grandchildren, and others, so Snask means life, in a way. Read the rest here.

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Two Type Designers to Watch

In the February issue of Print, we reached out to highly respected type-design aficionados and asked them which type designers we should all be watching. Each person featured has a unique take on their craft, and has had success with at least one typeface.

Here are two more type designers to follow in 2015.

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Berton Hasebe

Sunnyside, NY; www.bertonhasebe.com

“Berton brings a freshness to typeface design that is rarely seen. His inventive fonts are reshaping the ways in which typographers, and their audience, are accustomed to thinking about type.” —Ken Barber

“While studying graphic design, I liked the idea of using the typefaces I drew in my own work. I appreciated the time and effort that went into making a typeface, and realizing how much experience is necessary motivated me to continue practicing,” Berton Hasebe says. Taking that initiative, he attended the Type and Media master’s program at the Royal Academy of Art, The Hague. While there, he designed Alda, which started as an exploration of different weight characteristics of letterforms, comparing them to physical objects. He liked seeing how far he could push type design standards and create something that would still be relevant and useful. Although Hasebe still likes to push boundaries, he is a bit more practical in his approach. Read rest here.

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Terrance Weinzierl

Grand Rapids, MI; www.monotype.com

“Terrance is a terrific young designer whose work ranges from delightfully fanciful calligraphic lettering to industrial-strength sans serif typefaces—and pretty much everything in-between.” —Allan Haley

“When I found out that not all type designers are dead, and that it was a contemporary practice, I wanted to learn more,” Terrance Weinzierl recalls. “I remember exploring Adobe Caslon Pro in depth, and learning about OpenType features. Then, in an advanced typography class, I was assigned to design a typeface. I was hooked.” Read rest here.