Roxy Prima On Going Out On Her Own

Roxy Prima will be one of three instructors teaching “The Business of HandLettering,” for Modern Thrive next month. Here she tells us how she got started as a one-woman design/lettering/illustration shop, and how she keeps busy and promotes her work.

I started my business after a long time of being unsatisfied working full-time as a graphic designer in the media industry. I had always craved the freedom of working for myself, but it took me a long time before I felt like I could really take that leap. Once I decided that my goal would be to work for myself, I started taking on as many freelance projects as possible, while still working a full-time job. I would get up early to work before I went to my job, and after my eight hours, I would work well into the night and on weekends. Essentially I was working two full time jobs! It wasn’t easy, but the idea of eventually working for myself was a great motivator. Read the rest of her story, here.

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Lettering for Beginners: A Guide to Getting Started

Lettering for Beginners: 5 Tips to Get You Going

From street signs to chalkboard menus to national ad campaigns, hand lettering is everywhere. But it’s also intimidating for those of us who are just getting started. It takes practice, so luckily we have two lettering experts, Annica Lydenberg and Roxy Prima, to give us some tips to get started.

1. Choose Your Pens & Pencils

Having the right supplies will help make hand lettering easier, but you don’t have to go out and spend a fortune on pens and pencils right away. There is an extensive range of devices, depending on what kind of style you are going for in your lettering.

Pencils: Mechanical or Lead In

Prima notes, “I like to use mechanical pencils because they always stay sharp. My favorite is the Koh-l-Noor Mephisto Pencil.”

Lead in pencils can be hard or soft, ranging from 6H (hard) – 6B (soft), with HB being middle of the road. Lydenberg says, “I typically sketch at first with lighter pencils—meaning harder lead—and then move on to softer lead, darker pencils, once my design has taken more shape.” Take a look at this pencil hardness guide for reference. If you’re just starting out, you can grab just about any drawing pencil set from your local art supply store. Read rest of article here.

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Roxy Prima