Matteo Bologna: Pushing the Limits of Typography

As a young, horny man living in his mother’s house in Milan, Italy, Matteo Bologna taught himself how to design type while on the phone with an annoying girlfriend. While she talked and complained and cried for hours on end, he toyed with the seductive curves and shapes of letterforms on his computer, and eventually broke up with the girl. He found typography to be much sexier. Besides, her pasta would never be as good as his mama’s.

Young Matteo’s love of typography only intensified when he started receiving The Type Director’s Club (TCD) annuals filled with designs by Louise Fili, Paula Scher, Seymour Chwast, and Charles S. Anderson. He copied and cajoled their work, and knew the only chance he had to really break into design was to move to New York City, which he did in 1994. Shortly thereafter, he formed Mucca and he landed a big break, designing the brand for a new French brasserie, Balthazar, which quickly became famous for its delectable breads, pastries, and pommes frites. The design community also took notice of Matteo for his exquisite handling of the restaurant’s identity. The rest, as they say, is history.

Here we talk to Matteo about the power of type in design and the ways in which he pushes it. Read the interview here.

When Past Meets Present the Future is Brighter

Dream the Impossible Dream: Craig Welsh Restores a Masterpiece

A Nearly Forgotten Font, Euclid, Is Resurrected Through a
Nearly Lost Art Form: Wood Type.

Though Alvin Lustig left this earth more than 60 years ago, his modern design influence has left an indelible mark in design history. It’s hard to believe that he died so young, at age 40—when most of us are hitting our career stride—considering his output and influence in mid-century modern design. Thankfully, his widow, Elaine Lustig Cohen, carried on his legacy and has ensured his works would never be forgotten.

In 2010, the book Born Modern, written by Steven Heller and Lustig-Cohen, was published. It encompasses Lustig’s design accomplishments and details his theories on design. It also talked about his influences in typography, which sparked an idea for designer Craig Welsh of Go Welsh, based in Lancaster, Pa. He wanted to revive a font originally designed by Lustig in 1930, called Euclid, and turn it into a woodtype font family. Welsh, who holds degrees in architecture and graphic design, is an avid student of design history, typography, and poster design. His work has been published on both sides of the Atlantic and he has won recognition at every major design show and publication. Read the rest here.

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The Rise of @Goodtype

Designer Brooke Bucherie, from Austin, Texas, was obsessed with type and hand lettering, so she collected it … sort of. She randomly gathered screen shots of type she loved online, and when her iPhone ran out of space, she started an Instagram feed called @Goodtype in 2013, to store her collection, crediting the artists who created the lettering. Over time, she noted that artists were hash-tagging their type pieces #goodtype, and people started following her feed—a lot of people. The Instagram feed now has more than 185,000 followers, and the numbers increase each week.

With its growing popularity, she’s decided to publish a book that will feature 100 never-before-seen lettering samples submitted by the Goodtype followers. Bucherie says, “I’m so excited to bring the Goodtype feed to life into a tangible form. I want to expose the work of these many talented individuals and get this book onto as many bookshelves, coffee tables, and classrooms as possible.” She’s planning on starting a Kickstarter campaign to get buy-in from her huge following so she can self-publish the book. “It should be a lot of fun and a great way to reward our followers,” she notes. Read the rest here.

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