Where are they now?

Let’s revisit 10 of the people who played major roles in the design industry in the ’90s and early 2000s: David Carson, Bill Cahan, Sean Adams, Noreen Morioka, Robynne Raye, Michael Strassburger, John Sayles, Sheree Clark, David Salanitro and Jennifer Sterling

Some are still doing the work they’ve always loved. Others have changed careers completely. But all of them are applying the same creative passion that elevated their design work decades ago to their new pursuits.

In the early ’90s, the graphic design landscape was undergoing a dramatic shift. Desktop publishing was in its infancy and everyone was making it up as they went along—some better than others—while trying to keep up with the new technology and software. Then in 2000, the dotcom bubble burst, and in 2008 the worst recession since the Great Depression hit. Many studios weathered the storm, while others simply closed shop.

Here, we talk with the survivors of the past few decades, many of whom have reimagined their careers, and in some cases, started new vocations altogether. Read the rest here. (Poster design by Modern Dog.)

The Art of Storytelling

Marika Maijala, based in Helsinki, Finland, has always loved books. In fact, she says that reading helped her survive her “tough teenage years.” It wasn’t until later, though, that she discovered that she could make a living illustrating stories. Fortunately, her love of reading has helped her succeed in her career as an illustrator, because it’s one of the most important functions of the job—getting a feel for the characters and their thoughts and actions. “I usually read the manuscript a few times and then let it live in my head a while, before starting to sketch the images,” Maijala explains. “I trust my intuition, so oftentimes the number of the spreads and the outline of the story come quite naturally. I somehow see the story like a film inside my head.” She often tries different adaptations and approaches when it comes to composition, color, and even characters, but finds that the first iteration is usually the way to go. Read the rest here.