Archive for June 2015

Branding Towne Bakery: A Logo Case Study

Entrepreneur and baker du jour Jason Sigala wanted to open his own bakery in Southern California, offering quality, old-fashioned American desserts made from scratch. He wanted his shop’s branding to have a decidedly mid-century East Coast look and feel. Tim Frame was commissioned to create the brand identity for this foodie start-up, that would be called Towne Bakery.

Sigala provided Frame with plenty of visual inspiration derived from traditional New York bakeries, as well as a visual audit of the competition.

Here, we ask Frame how he approached this project and how all the logo elements came together. Read the interview here.

TB sketches

Preliminary sketches by Tim Frame for Towne Bakery logo.

Design Links: A Chain of Creative Inspiration, Part 2

This is part two in my new series, Design Links, on the HOW Design blog. Every other week, three artists will be featured whose work offers fresh, fun and stimulating creative inspiration. Each artist picks the next link—someone who personally inspires him/her. Check out the first part in the series, featuring John Foster, David Plunkert and Seymour Chwast, here

The links in this chain feature Jenn David Connolly, RaShelle Roberts, and Laura Zollar. Read the full story here.

Eye Of Venus

Artwork by Laura Zollar.

Where Are the Local Police When You Need Them?

I live near Bradley Park, and I often take my children and dog there. Last week, the unthinkable happened: An unleashed pit bull attacked another dog being walked by its owner.

The pit bull’s owner yelled to his dog, and then he started yelling at the other dog’s owner. His dog was attacking her dog, not the other way around. No one was helping the woman, so I ran over and yelled at the pit bull’s owner, “Your dog should be on a leash.” He approached me holding his dog by the collar in one hand and a can of beer in the other, screaming at me to “Shut the f&%@ up.”

He was within two feet of me. Honestly, I was scared he was going to hit me. I told him repeatedly not to get any closer, and I pulled out my phone and dialed 911. He yelled some more and finally walked away, gathering his friends. At least one other person called 911. I told the dispatcher that he was leaving and where he was walking, thinking a police officer would surely show up soon.

The true crime of this story is that no officers ever arrived. I called again when the man reappeared in the park several minutes later to pick something up that he left behind. I asked if any police were coming and the dispatcher said no, because I had said the guy was leaving. Really? There were plenty of witnesses willing to talk, not to mention a bleeding dog. I gave a description of the man, said he was still there and that we were leaving because I was afraid of him and I had my daughter with me. Again, no cops arrived. Approximately 30 minutes later, after we returned home, the police called and wanted to talk.

When I asked the officer why no one responded, he said that at the same time, he got a call about a guy who broke his leg at the RiverPlex, and that took precedence. Really? Don’t the Fire Department and EMTs deal with a broken leg? I questioned his logic and he said, “How would you feel if you were the guy with the broken leg?” I responded that there was a loose pit bull in a public park attacking another dog and children were present. He seemed to shrug.

Is there only one police officer on duty at a time in this city? I later learned that this officer was from the Park District, where my call was dispatched.

When I call 911, I expect an officer to arrive on the scene, even if the situation has dissipated. I don’t care whose jurisdiction the emergency falls under. Someone better respond, and in a timely manner.

This story was published in the June 6, edition of The Peoria Journal Star.

5 Exercises to Help You Learn Perspective Drawing

Jorge Paricio is an adjunct professor of Industrial Design at the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD), and author of Perspective Sketching, Freehand and Digital Drawing Techniques for Artists & Designers by Rockport Publishers. “Industrial design sketching is a crucial part of developing a concept and it usually starts with the creation of lots of thumbnail sketches that are later refined in successive stages into full renderings,” he says. “Our concepts have to tell a complex story, from how the product will be made to how it will operate.”

Paricio walks us through five drawing exercises demonstrating the importance of perspective sketching. Whether you’re an industrial, interior, or graphic designer, getting a handle on drawing will help you grow as a communicator. Read rest of article here.

Blog-coffee-maker-hands

In this example we see a coffee maker concept in a complex composition that involves a full concept, a partially rendered part, text blocks (called callouts), arrows to indicate movement, body parts, and a background shape that unifies everything. In a concept page, such as this, it’s important to have a cohesive composition, so the page isn’t disorganized. Call outs explain the purpose of each compartment, while rendered hands demonstrate how to use the coffee maker.

 

Web Design 101: What All New Designers Need to Know

Andy Pratt and Jesse Arnold are leaders in the new frontier of web design. Andy has worked with organizations including the Smithsonian Institution, Samsung, Cartoon Network, Nickelodeon, Wenner Media, Lego and Turner Broadcasting, and Jesse’s resume lists names like New York University, Conde Nast, and the Jim Henson Company.

Below, Pratt helps sort out the misconceptions of what it means to be a web designer vs. developer, and the changing skill sets required to create beautiful, functional websites.

What exactly is web design today?

Web design is the process of creating a browser based product or experience that will be delivered to a variety of device types, sizes, and resolutions. Many websites or apps will provide a service, distribute content and/or connect people. The best ones will have a clear purpose and meet business goals and user needs. Read rest of article here.